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The latest insights on resilience and disaster risk management
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Just planting a tree or protecting a forest, however, is not necessarily NBS. For example, while mangrove planting as a restoration approach is popular, many planting projects fail to restore a functioning mangrove system, often caused by a poor understanding of socio-economic conditions, ecological conditions or a lack of community support. NBS are actions meant to protect, sustainably manage, and restore natural or modified ecosystems, simultaneously providing human well-being and biodiversity benefits. As NBS investments are increasing globally, it is critical to ensure that nature-based solutions are in fact solutions.

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Many teams are already supporting the collection of disability-disaggregated data in a number of ways, and it is important for the World Bank’s Global Practice for Urban, Resilience and Land, which is spearheading resilience building, to join in these efforts. Doing so will support our government counterparts in upholding their commitments to the Sendai Framework, and put a much-needed emphasis on the importance of disability-inclusive disaster risk management in Africa.  

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In April 2018, cities across Tanzania experienced severe flooding, which displaced over 2,000 households in the country’s commercial capital of Dar es Salaam. By one estimate, the flooding in Dar es Salaam affected up to 1.7 million people, with economic losses equivalent to 4 percent of the city’s GDP. On average, affected households lost 23 percent of their annual income, notwithstanding additional impacts on people’s health and education.

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After a decade of strong economic growth, in 2019, Tanzania officially achieved lower-middle-income status. Despite its remarkable economic leap, the country and its commercial center, Dar es Salaam, continue to face growing threats from severe and recurrent flooding.  

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Our research found that while there exists a range of legal and policy tools that island states could use to protect their maritime entitlements, addressing sea level rise impacts will also require re-examination of the current paradigms of international law.

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Is disaster risk management’s sole purpose to reduce damages from natural hazards or is it a more fundamental requirement for growth and development?

Consider an urban location that is close to many jobs and services but is subjected to frequent floods. A few households may decide to settle there for accessibility, but they will unlikely invest much in their dwellings given the annual destructions. Most households will likely prefer to stay away, even if they have to spend more time and money in a daily commute.

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Evidence of climate extremes—the recent flooding in India, Germany and China, and heatwaves and wildfires in Greece and North America—is stronger than ever. At the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), we are hopeful that this will be point of inflection, where world leaders pull together to take decisive climate action to steer us away from the abyss. 

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Welcome to #FreetowntheTreeTown—an unconventional tree-planting campaign. This innovative effort not only harnesses digital and disruptive technology to create skilled employment opportunities for local youth during the COVID-19 pandemic; it also establishes long-term climate resilience for the community.

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So how is Central America working to expedite intra-regional assistance to benefit disaster-affected populations?  

The coordinated response among the region’s countries and the agile and timely arrival of humanitarian assistance in the context of disasters and emergencies can make the difference between life and death for many communities . This is especially relevant in Central America, the second most exposed and vulnerable region in the world to disasters, which often affect several countries simultaneously, as was the case after Hurricanes Eta and Iota in 2020.