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The latest insights on resilience and disaster risk management
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At the time of writing, there are over 9 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide. Governments are racing to curb its spread, in part by ramping up social distancing policies. Many non-essential businesses are closed, and citizens have been asked (or ordered) to stay home—all with the goal of saving lives and livelihoods.

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The Kaalavastha podcast series aims to capture some of the stories behind how one state is building a more resilient future for itself . Through a series of 6 episodes, we dive deep into God’s Own Country, following multiple protagonists on this journey, and getting a behind-the-scenes perspective from the communities, government, scientists, diaspora, World Bank staff, and even the cultural voice of Kerala itself!

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Although the immediate approach is to respond to the health crisis, the financial risk associated with natural hazards does not cease to exist. One option to address this challenge is to establish, prior to disasters and emergencies, fiscal and financial protection strategies.

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When compared to densely populated areas, rural communities are more vulnerable to major health crises. So how do we support improved rural accessibility to hospitals in disaster-prone areas? One solution is geospatial data.

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Central America’s diverse population includes more than 60 groups of Indigenous Peoples, whose systems of cultural, economic, political, and social organization have developed over centuries.  These ethnic groups have been contributing throughout that time to what we now call disaster risk management (DRM) and adaptation to climate change with their own brand of knowledge, science, and traditional practices. 

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The government of Malawi is creating a better, more resilient built environment
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Risk is something we can collectively work to mitigate for a more resilient world.
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As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues, governments and emergency services are focusing on immediate needs: boosting capacity in hospitals, addressing hunger, and protecting firms and families from eviction and bankruptcy. The majority of the funds flowing so far from the World Bank, the IMF, other regional development banks, or central banks seek to provide funds for protective gear at hospitals, stabilize financial institutions, pay companies to provide goods and services to essential workers, or provide direct cash support to households.

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Sameh Wahba , Alanna Simpson , Ana Campos Garcia , Joaquin Toro
Quick access to predictable financing is critical for responding to emergencies like COVID-19.