Resilience to Climate Change is one of GFDRR’s core operating principles. The program supports climate- and disaster-resilient development, aiming to improve identification and understanding of risk under future climate scenarios; avoid the creation of new risks and reduce existing risks; and support the design and implementation of investment policies that include climate-resilience measures.

Climate change poses complex problems for sustainable development, and requires integrated solutions. GFDRR focuses its climate resilience activities in four complementary priorities, aligned with the Paris Agreement and the World Bank’s Climate Change Action Plan 2016-2020.te climate and disaster risk management.

 

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Pillars

Pillars of our Resilience to Climate Change Work

Institutional Strengthening

Through technical assistance, GFDRR provides operational advice and supports policy reforms to integrate climate and disaster risk considerations into development policies, strategies, regulations, plans, and programs.

  • The Resilience to Climate Change team provides technical assistance grants to projects that address climate challenges on the ground.
Tools, Methods, and Innovations

GFDRR’s position within the World Bank provides the ability to generate, synthesize, and disseminate knowledge, methodologies, and decision-making tools to ensure climate resilience is a consideration in large development activities. GFDRR combines expertise in disaster risk management and climate adaptation to provide innovative solutions for resilient development.

  • The Resilience to Climate Change program works to support high-priority analytical work focusing on climate resilience.
  • The Small Island States Resilience Initiative (SISRI) produces Best Practice Notes highlighting climate resilience within its global community.
Enhancing Access to Financial Resources

Grants from GFDRR complement other global climate funds to enhance access to financial resources. Technical assistance grants have helped prepare and co-finance operations with the Climate Investment Funds, the Global Environmental Facility, the GCF, and other funding facilities.

  • GFDRR, in partnership with the International Development Associaton (IDA) and Climate Investment Funds (CIF), is currently helping build the institutional capacity of the Bangladesh Water Development Board (BWDB) to mitigate the impact of storm surges and salt water intrusion in coastal polders.
Targeting Action to Vulnerable Sectors

GFDRR supports actions with high potential for reducing vulnerabilities across all development sectors.

  • Vulnerable sectors and geographic areas—including transport, water, agriculture, energy, urban settings, and coastal zones—can benefit from innovative solutions to disaster risk reduction.
  • Risk-informed spatial planning and nature-based solutions are "no/low-regret" methods to improve resilience in high-risk areas. No matter how the climate may vary in the future, these approaches will produce positive effects for communities, helping build resilience and keep people safer in a changing world.

Resilience to Climate Change By The Numbers

183
Grants
$142.5M
70
Countries
Helpful Resources
Publication

This report presents the World Bank’s experience in climate and disaster resilient development, and contends that such development is essential to eliminating extreme poverty and achieving shared prosperity by 2030. Thee report recognizes, however, that such development requires additional start-up costs, which pay off in the long run if done correctly. 

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Publication

A collection of knowledge notes on tackling coastal resilience challenges.

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Feature

Small island developing states are some of the most vulnerable nations in the world, and face significant challenges in building resilience. A new World Bank/GFDRR and OECD joint report examines the state of financing to fund risk-reduction efforts in small island states, providing key recommendations to help island nations achieve a stronger and more resilient future.

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