Financial Solutions for City Resilience: Cohort 2

Event Summary

The Financial Solutions for City Resilience Conference brings together delegates from 20 cities, World Bank task team leaders, technical experts from global financial advisories, and private developers to discuss and refine infrastructure financing options in the urban resilience agenda. City delegates will have access to technical experts in areas of capital budgeting, municipal finance, land value capture, and PPPs/concessions, who will discuss concepts and methods of deploying private-sector financing in the resilience-focused capital investment plans. The Conference objective is to help cities navigate a range of options for deploying private capital in resilience building and identify opportunities of mobilizing private finance in cities’ capital plans.

The conference focuses on each type of financial instrument, based on case studies of how these instruments have been used in different markets. The event will culminate in a “shark tank” event on the final day where city leaders present their investment ideas to a panel of financial advisors who will give feedback on how to structure the resilience investment opportunities. The Conference outputs will be integrated into subsequent capital mobilization efforts with the aim to further elaborate and verify the feasibility of identified infrastructure transactions and advance with transaction structuring.

The conference is hosted by the World Bank’s City Resilience Program (CRP), which aims to catalyze longer term, more comprehensive, multi-disciplinary packages of technical and financial services, building the pipeline for “Bankable” resilience building projects at the city level. CRP’s focus on private capital mobilization stems from the need for the World Bank to better support developing cities to address a significant and increasing infrastructure financing gap and links to the Maximizing Finance for Development (MFD) agenda.[1] CRP focuses on three modalities for attracting private capital to urban infrastructure investments: borrowing from capital markets and commercial sources (direct lending), concessions structuring/PPP, and mobilizing equity and innovative financing instruments through Land Value Capture (LVC).

 

Pre-Conference Activities

The CRP private capital team will lead an external assessment to gain a better understanding of: 1) how the city government (or any level of national or sub-national government representing city interests in the transaction) has handled a PPP transaction; 2) details on precedent transactions, including industries and delivery structures; and, 3) factors which have hindered initiation and/or implementation of PPP transactions.

The CRP private capital team will lead an external assessment of the market and regulatory environment for transactions involving the monetization of city’s land and real assets. The assessment will focus on providing a better understanding of: 1) the real estate market environment and how it enables implementation of various land value capture tools; 2) transparency of land and real estate pricing; 3) the track record of cities’ engagement in direct negotiations with private investors including deployment of land-based financing tools (development contracts with infrastructure conditions, assessing impact fees, development charges, etc.).

1. City Creditworthiness Self-Assessment

The City Creditworthiness Self-Assessment (www.citycred.org) evaluates the quality of each city’s financial management processes and access to finance. The self-assessment takes 3-4 hours and should be completed by city officials with access to information pertaining to the city’s finances.

2. Exploring each City’s Track Record in Structuring PPPs

The CRP private capital team will lead an external assessment to gain a better understanding of: 1) how the city government (or any level of national or sub-national government representing city interests in the transaction) has handled a PPP transaction; 2) details on precedent transactions, including industries and delivery structures; and, 3) factors which have hindered initiation and/or implementation of PPP transactions.

3. Survey of Enabling Conditions for Land Value Capture

The CRP private capital team will lead an external assessment of the market and regulatory environment for transactions involving the monetization of city’s land and real assets. The assessment will focus on providing a better understanding of: 1) the real estate market environment and how it enables implementation of various land value capture tools; 2) transparency of land and real estate pricing; 3) the track record of cities’ engagement in direct negotiations with private investors including deployment of land-based financing tools (development contracts with infrastructure conditions, assessing impact fees, development charges, etc.).

All three activities will be completed for each city and circulated before the Conference, by June 30. The information collected throughout these assessments will be instrumental in tailoring the agenda of the Bangkok Conference to the specific needs of participating cities, including contents of working sessions, composition of subject-specific working groups, etc. The objective is to ensure that city delegates arrive at the conference fully prepared to discuss the concrete opportunities and concrete tools in financing urban resilience projects.

Agenda & Presentations

Day 0 (Sunday, July 8)

Time Subject Speakers Format

6:30-9:00

Welcome Reception

   

Day 1 (Monday, July 9)

Time Subject Speakers Format

8:15-9:00

Registration and Breakfast

   

9:00-9:15

Introduction and Welcome Address

Phil Karp

Speech

9:15-9:30

Keynote Speech

Focus on how Bangkok’s resilience plan is linked to private capital mobilization, mention the Go Game! and welcome the delegates to Bangkok

Dr. Supachai Tantikom, Bangkok Chief Resilience Officer 

Speech

9:30-10:30

9:30-9:45
 

What the City Resilience Program Offers You: Financial Solutions for City Resilience

Conference Framing: overview of participants, roles of support to city delegations (financial advisors, CRP, TTL), overview of week’s agenda, introduction to shark tank activity

Financing Sources: overview of municipal sources for finance, including private capital

Marc Forni,  
Roland White 

Presentation (PPT, PollEV)

9:45-10:05

10:05-10:30

CRP Capital Mobilization Overview: program overview, progress to date (video from November event), select Phase 2 city examples, end by highlighting that each city present will be eligible to receive Phase 2 support should the demand and opportunity align    

10:30-11:00

Tea break

   

11:00-12:15

11:00-11:25

Review and Share City Rapid Capital Assessments

Cities share their creditworthiness self-assessments; PPP readiness assessments; and LVC assessments with each other at Tables

Overview of the 3 assessments, why were they completed before the conference, what they say and don’t say, and instructions for activity

Andrey Shanin

Presentation
(PPT) 

11:25-11:40

11:40-11:55

11:55-12:10

12:10-12:25

12:25-12:30

Internal Review by Cities of City Rapid Capital Assessments 

Peer Sharing: Round 1 
Peer Sharing: Round 2
Peer Sharing: Round 3

Wrap-up

Facilitator: 
Phil Karp

Shift & Share (3 Shifts)

12:30-1:30

Lunch Break

   

1:30-1:45

Cultural Bingo

Haruka Imoto

Hand-out

13:30-17:00

Go Game

Private Capital Scavenger Hunt

Elena

Gamification
Download App

19:00-20:30

Cocktail Reception & Dinner 

Go Game Awards

   

Day 2 (Tuesday, July 10)

Time Subject Speakers Format

8:50-9:00

9:00-12:30

9:00-10:00

Introduction and overview of day topics and objectives

Presentation and Q&A

Three speakers present on debt instruments, land value capture, and guarantees, each followed by a short Q&A

Debt Instruments Presentation

Q&A

Phil Karp

Roland White, Lead Urban Specialist, World Bank
 

Speech

Presentation (PPT), Q&A 
 

10:00-10:30

Tea break

   
10:30-11:30

Land Value Capture

Q&A

Matthew Hunt, Private Capital Consultant, World Bank 

Presentation (PPT) and PollEV

11:30-12:30

Guarantees (followed by 15 min Q&A)
Q&A

Richard MacGeorge, Lead Infrastructure Finance Specialist, Financial Structures and PPPs, World Bank

Presentation Q&A/Discussion 

12:30-13:30

Lunch Break

   

13:30-15:00

Case studies (First Round)
In-depth case studies will be presented concurrently in breakout rooms

Case study 1: How Durban City is catalyzing urban development and ensuring city resilience using partnership model with private partner leveraging on private capital participation

We will discuss how Durban city authorities (EMC) has formed a unique partnership with large private player THD (several million hectares of sugar farming land in Durban region) to catalyze city development. Practical examples of projects executed will be discussed including: 

  • Umhlanga Ridge New Town Centre A ‘greenfields’ mixed-use urban node within the Durban city-system undertaken by THD to assist in creating a more complex, poly-nucleated urban structure that breaks the mold of suburban sprawl and stand-alone ‘edge-city’ shopping malls: a return to the values and traditions of integrated, complex city-building. 
  • The Ntshongweni Integrated Urban Initiative A ‘greenfields’ 2200 ha new-town-in-town on an important freight corridor on the outer edge of the Durban city-region undertaken by THD with the very close policy involvement of both the Metropolitan authority (the EMC) and Provincial Government. The emphasis in planning has been on the integration of semi-rural, marginalized communities into a cohesive prospect of economic opportunity with principles of city sustainability being taken to unprecedented levels of innovation at scale.

Erky Wood, GAPP Architects & Urban Designs

Presentation
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Q&A

 

Case study 2: Morocco industrial land/zone PPPs

A joint Deloitte US and Deloitte France team conducted market and legal and regulatory due diligence to identify high potential industrial zones in the Casablanca metropolitan area, resulting in an in-depth analysis of three such industrial zones. A market assessment, legal and regulatory analysis, and infrastructure assessment resulted in financial models for zone development, as well as strategies for site-level Public Private Partnership (PPP) transactions.

Steven Hamilton, Senior Manager, Deloitte U.S.
Souad El Ouazzani, Director, Deloitte France

 
 

Case study 3: Land and Real Estate Asset Management

Urban Local Bodies (ULBs) have a number of revenue sources including taxes, service fees and investment income – upto 50 income streams can potentially be leveraged. Cities are still evolving their approach to maximizing revenues from these various sources. The case will layout the various sources revenue; introduce high level levers for revenue maximization and asset & land monetization; and discuss how these levers were employed to actually increase revenues by over 30% in a middle eastern country.

Christian Azoury, Associate Partner, McKinsey

Presentation

 

Case study 4: Examples of guarantees deployed in sub-sovereigns from around the world

The guarantee case study session will build on the Guarantees Presentation Q&A given on Tuesday morning. A series of example sub-sovereign projects from around the world that employ guarantees will be examined. The intent is to illustrate some of the many ways that guarantees can be used flexibly to help improve the cost and quality of infrastructure services.

Richard MacGeorge, Lead Infrastructure Finance Specialist, Financial Structures and PPPs, World Bank

 

15:00-15:30

Coffee Break

   

15:30-17:00

Case studies (Second Round)
In-depth case studies will be presented concurrently in breakout rooms

Case Study 5: Learning from Wroclaw: How the City Benefits from Urban Resilience Enhancements

Case study presenting how investments into flood protection and management secured Wroclaw against major flood risk (1997 flood material damages are estimated at billions of dollars) and helped the city develop enabling environment catalyzing impressive economic growth of the city and fostering private capital interest. We will discuss delivery mechanisms, financing sources and effects of investments.

Janusz Zaleski, Former Project Director, Odra-Vistula Flood Management Project Coordination Unit

Karolina Grzyb, Director of Business Support Center, Wroclaw

Presentation

 

Case studies 6: Leveraging Transit Assets through Land Value Capture

The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority (MBTA) is the primary transit authority for the city of Boston in the United States. The Boston transit system is the oldest in the United States, and as such is in a constant need of repairs, maintenance, and capital improvements.  Seeking to find new sources of revenue beyond ticket fares, the MBTA embarked on a landmark effort over 15 years ago to privatize its real estate operations.  The MBTA brought in a real estate and financial management firm to conduct asset and portfolio assessments to determine how to get more out of its real estate. Through creative uses of disposition, long-term leases, P3s, lease management, advertising and telecommunication upgrades, and other efforts, the MBTA has been able to raise an additional $600M in capital from real estate operations alone. This session will focus on how the MBTA has achieved this and discuss several specific case studies of LVC and strategic real estate portfolio management.

Matthew Hunt, Private Capital Consultant, World Bank 

Presentation

 

Case Study 7: Transit Oriented Development in Medellin and Honolulu

HR&A delivered a funding and governance strategy for the redevelopment and future operations of Metro de Medellín’s Parque Berrío Station and surrounding open space in Medellín, Colombia’s historic center. The team presented funding and governance options reliant on private sector participation and the use of value capture tools. Options included potential leases to private retail operators, optimization of revenue from advertising, and the creation of a business improvement district. On behalf of the Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation (HART), HR&A assessed high-level and order of magnitude estimates of value from TOD and other non-farebox opportunities as part of a rapid go/no-go assessment of P3 feasibility for the construction of the final segment of the Honolulu Rail Transit Project and future operations and maintenance of the entire system. HR&A will conduct a market scan for multifamily residential in planned station areas on City and HART-owned properties with high potential for multifamily-focused TOD and prepare a series of high-level stabilized year feasibility analyses. HR&A will explore potential revenue-generating uses beyond TOD that may be delivered within, or in coordination with, stations and the path of the rail guideway.

Amitabh Barthakur, Partner, HR&A Advisors

Presentation

 

Case Study 8: Financing Solid Waste Infrastructure: Thames Tideway Project

The Thames Tideway Tunnel (“TTT”) project is a 25km tunnel to run beneath the River Thames in the centre of London. TTT will connect 34 existing combined sewer overflows and prevent 70 million cubic tonnes of sewage from running into the Thames annually. The sewer will be built and operated by a private company, using private finance. The innovative PPP structure opened the door to £3bn of private finance and the case study will focus on the mechanisms used to transfer risk, which enabled it to be financed largely using private finance.

Caroline Haynes, Partner, Estates and Infrastructure Exchange

Mark Worrall, CEO, Estates and Infrastructure Exchange

Presentation

*Breakout rooms – 25th floor and 2nd floor 
**Free evening for participants
 

Day 3 (Wednesday, July 11)

Time Subject Speakers Format

9:00-9:15

Introduction and overview of day topics and objectives

Phil Karp

 

9:15-10:30

Knowledge Café

Teams will rotate around five stations, which will provide brief sector overviews for public transport, water supply and wastewater treatment, energy efficiency, solid waste management, and land redevelopment

Public Transport: 
Mark Smith, Managing Partner, Deloitte

Amitabh Barthakur, HR&A Partner

Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment:

Lukasz Stanecki, PwC 

Energy Efficiency:

PwC, Agnieszka Gajewska, PwC Partner, Capital Projects

Solid Waste Management:

Michael Flynn, Deloitte Ireland Partner

Land Redevelopment:

Steven Hamilton, Senior Manager, Deloitte U.S.

Souad El Ouazzani, Director, Deloitte France

Presentation (PPT)/Q&A

10:30-11:00

Tea Break

   

11:00-12:30

Clinics

Each city will choose a station for discussion and advisory from resource experts – experts will highlight types of predominant transaction structures for the sectors and the relative balance between public and private investment

Introduction:

Phil Karp

Public Transport: 

Mark Smith, Managing Partner, Deloitte

Amitabh Barthakur, HR&A Partner

Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment:

Oliver Redrup, PwC Director, Capital Projects & Infrastructure

Lukasz Staneck, PwC Manager

Energy Efficiency:

PwC, Agnieszka Gajewska, PwC Partner, Capital Projects

Solid Waste Management:

Michael Flynn, Deloitte Ireland Partner

Kushal Singh, Deloitte India Partner

Land Redevelopment:

Steven Hamilton, Senior Manager, Deloitte U.S.

Souad El Ouazzani, Director, Deloitte France

Discussion

12:30-13:30

Lunch – Networking

   

13:30-15:00

Case studies (Third Round)

In-depth case studies will be presented concurrently in breakout rooms

Case Study 9: From Crisis to Resilience: How Cape Town Averted its Water Crisis

Cape Town experienced one the worst droughts in recorded history. Three years of unseasonably low rainfall saw dam levels drop below 20 percent and the prospect of day zero, when taps ran dry, becoming a reality. Tourism, agriculture and wine industries, all key drivers of the economy were badly impacted. The City’s comprehensive response, coordinated with stakeholders (national and provincial government, business, general public and civil society) helped avert the looming crisis and in the process built resilience to withstand future events of similar magnitude.

Yogan Reddy, Partner/Director, PwC

Presentation

 

Case Study 10: Implementation of energy efficiency measures in the public street lighting system with private sector participation

Public street lighting system has a direct impact on the life of every citizen. It not only makes the streets safer for the citizens in the night, increased transportation and commercial activities also result in an increase in the income of the people. In India, the street lighting system  has been constrained by poor quality infrastructure, sub-standard service delivery levels and high electricity consumption / bills. This presents an opportunity to improve the service delivery levels and reduce the energy consumption by implementing energy efficiency measures. The Indian cities have focused on implementing such projects with private sector participation and the case study presents the prevalent implementation models, project development cycle and benefits to the cities post implementation of energy efficiency projects.

Sumeet Shukla, Investment Officer, IFC
Michael Flynn, Partner, Deloitte Ireland 

Presentation

 

Case Study 11: Private Sector Participation in Municipal Solid Waste Projects: Dublin Energy-from-Waste facility

Deloitte served as financial advisor to the City of Dublin’s waste management PPP, a 12-year $600 million transaction. Dublin Waste to Energy PPP Project contract was executed in Sept 2014 between Covanta Holding and Dublin City Council to build, own and operate a new 600,000 metric tonne per year, 58 net megawatt Energy-from-Waste facility in Dublin, Ireland . The project agreement executed with DCC will cover 45 years of facility operations, after which facility ownership will revert to DCC.  Under the project agreement, Covanta will be responsible for sourcing waste supply for the facility, which will consist of residential, commercial and industrial waste streams from Dublin and surrounding areas. During the first 15 years of operations, Dublin will share in any upside or downside in facility waste revenue relative to a baseline projection. Dublin will also share in energy revenue generated by the project for the full 45 year term of the contract. The procurement commenced in 2002, preferred tenderer was appointed in 2007 and financial close was achieved in 2014.  The reason for delays included political and environmental opposition, delays in financing during global financial crisis and changes in the lead Sponsor.  All of these were overcome and the facility is now operating successfully in Dublin.

Michael Flynn, Partner, Deloitte Ireland

Presentation

 

Case Study 12: Transambiental, IFC’s 1st investment in a private mass transport system operator

Until 2015, Cartagena, Colombia had a chaotic, disorganized, and inefficient transport system, in need of a complete overhaul. In Nov 2015, Transcaribe - Cartagena’s Bus Rapid Transit System, started operations. Transcaribe was structuring using a PPP model with the following components: (a) the infrastructure was provided by the City; and (ii) separate private concessions for the provision of the fleet and its operation & maintenance, the system’s fare collection, and the construction of its maintenance facilities. The case study will cover IFC’s experience in providing long-term financing to Transambiental, one of the system’s private fleet operators, including the main risks & issues from a lender’s perspective.

Ana Trujillo, Investment Officer, IFC

Presentation

 

Case Study 13: Case Study of Korea: land policies that led to successful city development

Korea’s land policies were goal-driven initiatives to support the economic development plans carried out by the government in the past. And like any country undergoing industrialization and urbanization, they also focused on challenges like speculation or environmental protection, and the role of the private sector in development. With the digitization of land information, policies are geared toward more open and transparent information, giving the public more access to information for healthier real estate transaction and empowering the local governments with an administration system that secures sound taxation for the cities. 

The session will present some of the key policies (like land valuation system, land price system, or land development promotion act) that contributed to the success of Korea’s land and urban development. There will also be a short presentation on the Korea Land Information System, which provide the data for the real estate management system today.

Mi-Ok Chae, Ph.D., CRO and Director, Appraisal Board Research Institute 

Beckhee Cho, General Director for Global Business, LX Korea Land and Geospatial Informatix Corp.

Presentation

15:00-15:30

Coffee Break

   

15:30-17:00

Case studies (Third round)

In-depth case studies will be presented concurrently in breakout rooms

Case Study 14: Singapore's approach to securing water supply leveraging on private capital participation 

The case study will discuss Singapore's integrated approach to water supply and demand management for solving the water crisis that the country had faced during the 70's. Now, Singapore has integrated the water infrastructure into its city to create resilient and multi-purpose infrastructure such as flood protection and recreational facility. We will also explore how Singapore leveraged private sector participation via PPPs to develop water supply infrastructure and dive into the details of a specific project to understand its intricacies including the project's structure and its payment mechanism.

Oliver Redrup, Director, PwC

Presentation

 

Case studies 15: PPP Viability for Mombasa, Kenya 2nd Nyali Bridge 

Mombasa is Kenya’s second biggest city and East Africa’s largest sea port. The existing Nyali Bridge was built in 1979 from the Government of Japan, and served the city for 35 years. It provided the only direct link between Mombasa North Coast Mainland and Mombasa Island. 

The 2nd Nyali Bridge was planned to reduce traffic congestion, and create a second direct access route; therefore, Mombasa explored a PPP for the development, operation, and maintenance of the bridge. Deloitte conducted a feasibility study to test the viability of PPP for the 2nd Nyali bridge project.

Mark A. Smith, Managing Director, Deloitte U.S.

Presentation

 

Case Study 16: PPPs for smart city infrastructure    

PPPs can be a very effective means of financing urban infrastructure. With cities increasingly leveraging smart technologies for their infrastructure build out it is important to understand how PPPs can be utilized to finance and deliver a part of the smart city rollout. The case will provide an introduction to PPPs in the urban context, evaluate the applicability of PPP in financing smart city infrastructure and highlight key challenges and best practices based on a real-life transaction from India.

Paul Jacobson, Manager, McKinsey

Presentation

 

Case Study 17: How to successfully leverage private capital in urban energy sector? 10 years of positive experience in Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe

We will discuss the best examples of how the cities, in cooperation with international institutions managed to attract private investors for urban energy sector – focusing on street lighting, waste to energy and energy efficiency projects. We will discuss the mechanisms used, major success factors and challenges to develop and finance such projects in emerging markets. In particular:

  1. How major Latin America cities leverage private capital in urban energy sector 

    Case studies discussing street lighting and waste to energy projects in selected cities in Latin America. We will talk about mechanisms used, key success factors, institutional, legal and financial drivers, different business models and financing alternatives.

    Street lighting Projects in Latin America with focus on the Mexico and Brazil experience:
    • Street lighting PPP Belo Horizonte City (Brazil) to upgrade 178,000 public street lights with more efficient LED lights. Largest project of this kind for public street lighting in Latin America.  
    • Guadalajara City. Mexico. Public lightning Lease-to-Own Delivery Model.


    Waste to Energy Projects with private investment in Latin America:
    • Mexico City WTE PPP Termo project, including design, construction, operation and maintenance of a waste to energy plant in Mexico City, for the generation and delivery of electricity to be used by Mexico City Subway System for up to 965,000 MWHr/Year. Will be one of the largest waste to energy facilities in the world and the first in Latin America.
    • Sao Paolo Ure Barueri WTE PPP with a planned waste treatment capacity of 825 tons per day. This is the first WTE project in Brazil.
  2. Stories of complex energy efficiency measures in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries over last 10 years.

    We will discuss how preferential financing and private sector involvement helped housing associations in CEE countries to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon footprint with no impact on residents spending.
    • Case studies of energy efficiency in residential buildings for Poland and Latvia.
    • How to structure and finance investments in EE in buildings to ensure affordability with minimal impact on residents spending? 
    • Cooperation with international organisations and donors – what instruments are most effective?
    • Key lessons learnt

Agnieszka Gajewska, Partner, PwC, Engagement Partner for World Bank City Resilience Program

Jorge Sere, Partner, PwC Latin America Hub for World Bank City Resilience Program

Lukasz Stanecki, PwC, Project Manager for World Bank City Resilience Program

Presentation

17:00-20:00

Dinner Cruise on the Chao Phraya River

   

*Breakout rooms – TBC 

Day 4 (Thursday, July 12)

Time Subject Speakers Format

9:00-9:30

Introduction to Shark Tank activity

On the final day, each city will be expected to make a pitch for private capital to a mock panel of potential investors who will weigh in, and ultimately decide which cities should get their money – cities will be introduced to the sharks and their areas of expertise

Marc Forni Presentation

9:30-10:30

What is the role of the financial advisors?

Moderated panel discussion on the role of financial advisors to work with cities in their efforts to mobilize private capital followed by a Q&A  

Moderator: Sameh Wahba

Discussants: Jorge Sere (PwC), Michael Flynn (Deloitte), Paul Jacobson (McKinsey)

Panel Discussion

10:30-11:00

Tea break

   

11:00-11:30

What makes a compelling pitch? 

Cities will get a crash course in how to communicate a pitch efficiently and effectively, and will practice with each other through a large group activity

Phil Karp 

 

11:30-12:30

What does the buy-side look for?

Investors will give lighting talks on what they are looking for when they invest in a project – this will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A from the audience

Moderator: Sameh Wahba

Discussants: Agnieszka Gajewska (PwC), Ana Trujillo (IFC), Caroline Haynes (EIE), Private Investor, Mark Smith (Deloitte)

Panel Discussion

12:30-13:30

Lunch

   

13:30-17:00

Preparation for Shark Tank Presentation 

Cities finalize their pitches/posters for Friday marketplace

Cities finalize their pitches/posters for Friday marketplace

 

18:00

Poster Preparation Deadline 

   

*Free evening for participants  

Day 5: Presentations

Time Subject Speakers Format

9:00-10:15

Shark Tank (First 5 Cities)

Cities will present their investment projects to a mock panel of potential investors who will provide feedback

Sharks: Each session will consist of three of the following: Ana Trujillo (IFC), Marc Forni (WB), Roland White (WB), Vijay Sarma (McKinsey), Caroline Haynes (EIE), Agnieszka Gajewska (PwC), Michael Flynn (Deloitte)

Clients 

Presentation

10:15-10:45

Poster Session (First 5 Cities)

Over the previous night the CRP team will have printed large posters out of each city’s presentations – cities can view other city’s projects and present their own in more detail to interested parties in an open space

Moderator: Phil Karp

Clients 

Poster session 

10:45-11:00

Tea break

   

11:00-12:15

Shark Tank (Second 5 Cities)

Sharks: TBC

Clients 

Presentation

12:15-12:45

Poster Session (Second 5 Cities)

Moderator: Phil Karp

Clients

Poster session 

12:45-13:30

Lunch

   

13:30-14:45

Shark Tank (Third 5 Cities)

Sharks: TBC

Clients 

Presentation

14:45-15:15

Poster Session (Third 5 Cities)

Moderator: Phil Karp

Clients

Poster session 

15:15-15:30

Tea break

   

15:30-16:45

Shark Tank (Fourth 5 Cities)

Sharks: TBC

Clients 

Presentation

16:45-17:15

Poster Session (Fourth 5 Cities)

Moderator: Phil Karp

Clients

Poster session

17:15-17:45

Awards ceremony and closing and introduction to CRP Phase II

The panel of investors will weigh in and present the best pitches with prizes – information will also be provided on how cities can engage with the program going forward to help identify specific transactions and unlock private capital investment

Marc Forni

Presentation

19:00-20:30

Farewell Reception

   

Conference Outputs

City Rapid Capital Assessments Results

A key feature of CRP is leveraging the WBG’s balance sheet to deliver greater resources to cities and boost bankability of cities’ capital investment programs in cities. This includes securing co-financing from other multilateral development banks and bilateral agencies and maximizing opportunities for crowding in private capital around each investment program.

For the purpose of this assignment, private sector participation in urban infrastructure investments is grouped into three primary modalities as follows:

  1. Direct lending to a government entity responsible for administering, provision and maintenance of public infrastructure (e.g., general obligation lending, such as through purchase of general obligations bond, as well as structured obligation lending and sub-sovereign commercial debt financing);
  2. Public-private partnerships (PPP)/concession that encompass various mechanisms of joint delivery of infrastructure projects with use of public and private funds.
  3. Land value capture, which is a broad set of transaction mechanisms that help public entities to capture land value increases associated with infrastructure upgrades.

The first step toward understanding opportunities and roadblocks for private capital investment in urban infrastructure requires analysis of baseline conditions for infrastructure financing. This indicative assessment represents an initial step for task teams in analyzing local conditions for unlocking private capital for urban infrastructure investment.

This assessment provides a high-level overview of the city on the basis of how respective national and subnational regulatory frameworks empower the city to access domestic and international capital markets, as well as understanding how national and local market fundamentals support leveraging private capital. Opportunities for attracting private capital financing are grouped into three main sources: direct lending from commercial sources, PPP/concessions structuring, and mobilizing equity through land-value capture.

This documents presents stop-lights charts for each city participating in the Assessment as well as cross-city summary, indicating prevalent color-coding and related scoring in each of the private sector mobilization modalities: bonds, bank loans, PPP/Concessions, and land-value capture.

See the RCA Results

Project Pitch Posters

Multimedia (click left and right to see more pictures)

Day 1

CRP 2018 Bangkok - Day One

Day 2

CRP 2018 Bangkok - Day Two

Day 3

CRP 2018 Bangkok - Day Three

Day 4

CRP 2018 Bangkok - Day Four

Day 5

CRP 2018 Bangkok - Day Five

Our Partners