The City Resilience Program (CRP) helps cities build resilience through designing the desired urban resilience investment project, and accessing additional financing to realize these projects. CRP differs from a traditional infrastructure projects in that it tackles the key issue in urban resilience financing--the lack of a market to connect investors and city governments.

A Two-Pronged Focus

Yang Aijun / World Bank

Capital Mobilization

 

Building urban resilience is a multi-million agenda, and oftentimes city governments lack the necessary funding. CRP helps cities expand and tap into extra sources of financing, through financing from the World Bank and other multi-lateral institutions, land value capture, and public-private partnerships.

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Technical Assistance

 

Leveraging the World Bank Group's broad sectoral expertise, CRP supports cities to address the different elements that comprise urban resilience, including infrastructure, institutions, and governance.

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A Three-Phased Approach
 

 

Project Scoping

1
 

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This phase focuses on preliminary assessments to define the set of activities needed to strengthen urban resilience. It also focuses on developing initial understanding of a city’s readiness to deploy various private capital mobilization instruments, including raising commercial debt, structuring PPPs, and leveraging private capital from land value capture transactions.

 

Diagnostic Assessment

2
 

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This phase focuses on technical working group engagements with client cities to carry out in-depth technical assessments. On the other hand, CRP will involve financial advisory firms to produce a Capital Investment Plan which includes a menu of transaction options and Capital Budgeting to define the sources and use of funds.

 

Project Implementation

3
 

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This phase will see the implementation of the identified investment project through World Bank loans and co-financing from other multilateral institutions, or through private sources via public-private partnerships or land value capture.